Original artworks sharing my journey available at Art Lovers Australia

Tuesday, June 1, 2010

Food that Goes on Giving

It's a year since I began creating my sustainable home and what a learning year it's been.

When I began my new garden I really did not know much but lectures at my community garden introduced me to many new concepts including that of hybrid and non-hybrid seeds.



This little Chrysanthemum plant growing here is a non-hybrid seed that is continuing to reproduce itself in my food garden where I planted its parent plant.

Non-Hybrid or Open-Pollinated are able to continue providing food or in this case companion planting in this way.

When I began my garden I always seemed to be spending on plants from local organic suppliers and now less than a year after beginning my garden already I always have something growing from seed.

This special basil seedling below is one of many from my original non-hybrid basil planting.



The edible dandelion here is also a new seedling from my original plant. Each day I have dandelion leaves in my salads. They are great liver cleansers and I just love their sharp taste.



There has been so much to learn to fulfill my dream of producing my own sustainable food but the concept of hyrid and  non-hybrid seeds is one I consider to be of prime importance not just for my own garden and budget but for the future of  food on our planet.

With patents now applying to many hybrid plants and the genetic modification of other plants non-hybrid seeds provide a way forward to maintain the diversity and quality of food.

14 comments:

HOOTIN' ANNI said...

the leaves and buds look like zinnas. Love the color. Oh yes, and dandelions. Can't get away from those.

Here is my Outdoor Wednesday...hope you can stop by to say howdy to me by CLICKING HERE -----a new Fountain by the Sea

g.suzie said...

Going green seems to be taking front and center more all time!
Interesting post sounds like you are learning lots!

Jean said...

Welcome to Bloomin' Tuesday! Very informative post. Thanks! Jean

Paula said...

I have bunches of dandelions growing in the wrong places! I have never eaten then before - I know the pioneers ate them all thetime made soup, salads etc. I think I should experiemetn - thanks for thepost! Paula in Idaho

Nancy said...

Thank you for sharing. I am certainly going to study up on sustainable gardening.

Lisa@BlessedwithGrace said...

Thanks for your post and making us more aware of the edible plants! Glad to linked up to TMTT.

eileeninmd said...

Great post, it is great that the dandelions are edible plants. Your flowers do look like the zinnia flowers I planted in pots this year.

Carver said...

I enjoyed this post very much. I've had many self seeding plants in my garden. When I was a more active gardener I even let a few broccoli and lettuce plants bolt so they would go to flower and then produce seeds. It doesn't take that many plants that are left to follow their natural cycle to produce the seeds for the next season. Fennel is another that produces many seeds. It's great seeing people that have a sustainable garden.

Leigh of Bloggeritaville said...

Great post! Thanks for participating in Thrifty Thursday this week! Hugs!
Leigh
Tales from Bloggeritaville
wwwlbratina.blogspot.com

MyMaracas said...

Good post! I have collected seeds, but haven't had much luck getting them to grow to maturity.

Meg said...

So great to meet you Ms artist. I have been growing food organically since I was a teenager in the early 7o's or so my sister says we were green before it was hip. Great to see you educating others with the info you discover. I grow flowers organically for sale and many people ask Why bother, you are not going to eat them? I disagree since organic gardening and sustainable living is all of life and once you discover how to live this way it is all-inclusive. I will be back again, keep up the good work. Meg

Melodie said...

Thanks for sharing this post over at Vegetarian Foodie Fridays. I like foraging for wild edibles in my woodsy yard. SInce we're moving I might just have to grow some purposely at my new place.

A piece of news said...

This year I especially decided to plant an heirloom tomato plant rather than hybrid.

Rambling Woods said...

I haven't given enough thought to hybrids and non-hybrids..something to really consider...Thank you for posting to Nature Notes....Michelle