Thursday, June 17, 2010

Seed Saving & Good Food

This year I have learned so much about seed saving and good food.

My first attempts at food gardening both at my home and the community garden were fully colored by the depth of my ignorance.

At the community garden gardeners range from the novice like myself to the experienced.

My first approach like so many others at the garden was to get seedlings from the local nursery into my plot as quickly as possible to get that food growing, but the more experienced gardeners were slower to get going, spent time adding manures, compost and for our specific large amount of dolomite to break down clay.

Many of the also used heirloom seeds which resulted in not only stronger plants but also a wider variety of foods.

Another benefit that has evolved from the use of these heirloom seeds is strong seedlings appearing around the garden.

The crows for example have done a generous job of spreading tomatoes seeds and I have been thrilled to discover many welcome tomato seedlings appearing in my plot or growing wild in corners of the garden.

Seedlings from these strong seeds are easy to grow. I always save these seedlings  knowing they will produce the strongest  plants and quality food..

I spent so much money buying seedlings from the nursery last year but this year the seedlings seem to be  supplying themselves.

Consequent of finding these seedlings I am also beginning my own adventure in seed saving to spread the joy of these strong plants even further.

Below is one of my current collections of seed pods and fruit seeds drying out in my kitchen.



This lettuce was a foundling. Has grown itself in a difficult area of my garden.


More great foundlings, lemon basil and apple basil bushes. Can't believe how quickly these grow and now always have some to share with friends and neighbors.


Still to ripen these little tomatoes from another stray seedling that grew from in its own strength and vigor.




11 comments:

Tootsie said...

I like to get seeds from my plants too and grow my own the following year...it is just so rewarding to know they are ALL mine!
thanks for linking to my meme this week...I have enjoyed my visit!

21st Century Housewife© said...

Your lettuces look wonderful - and it is great you are saving your own seeds. Much more economical and environmentally friendly!

Sherrie said...

Hi!
Your veggies and herbs look great. Have a great day!

Sherrie
Sherrie's Stuff
http://sherrie-plummer.blogspot.com/2010/06/fertilizer-friday_18.html

Darla said...

Harvesting seed is a big favorite thing of mine to do too!

siteseer said...

looks like you have a salad in the making ;) The Genesis diet is probably the best for you as you continue in your recovery.

Charity Singleton said...

I saved heirloom Mr. Stripey tomato seeds from last year and they are doing great this year. I just pulled my bolting spinach and threw them in the compost pile without grabbing the seeds. Wonder if it's too late? Great thoughts!

Charity Singleton said...

I thought I'd report back that I did go out and dig out my spinach seeds from the compost pile after I left my earlier message. We'll see if it works.

I just noticed your tagline about breast cancer. I also am a cancer survivor - two years NED. I started making my food choices before my diagnosis, but they fit well.

Blessings!

Crafty Green Poet said...

definitely a good idea to save seeds and grow from them! Nice to see the crows helping out around the garden too!

Sunita said...

How funny that both of us are posting about crows but for such vastly different reasons :)
Those 'foundlings' do look very healthy.

Rory from Tools Are For Women Too! said...

Still waiting on tomatos here...can't wait! Thanks for sharing with us on Modern Craftswoman Monday! Rory

Jean said...

Very nice looking plants. I'm afraid I'm too impatient to wait for seeds. Sounds like a super way to save money. Jean